These Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms are the perfect mix of sweet, salty, and umami! The mushrooms are crisped up, then coated in a sticky-sweet sauce for an easy plant-based dinner.

Bowl of rice with sticky sesame shiitake mushrooms, veggies, and chopsticks

“Sticky” is usually an undesirable quality, but when it’s used to describe food, you know something delicious awaits. When it comes to this shiitake mushroom recipe, the sticky descriptor means a sweet-and-savory sauce that clings to the shiitakes, coating them in flavour. Yes please!

In this dish, mushrooms are pan-fried until they’re perfectly crispy, then tossed in a sticky-sweet sesame ginger sauce. (You’ll recognize this sauce from my Sticky Sesame Cauliflower Wings, a reader favourite here on Jessica in the Kitchen!)

These mushrooms taste amazing by themselves, but they’re a treat on top of veggie burgers, rice (traditional or cauliflower rice!), or quinoa. They’re also an excellent addition to Buddha bowls and salads!

Overhead view of Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushroom ingredients with labels

Notes on Ingredients

Please note that this is important information on the ingredients and instructions and the FULL recipe with amounts and details can be found DOWN BELOW (scroll to it) in the recipe card.

  • Dried shiitake mushrooms
  • Cornstarch
  • Sesame oil
  • Maple syrup
  • Liquid aminos – Tamari, coconut aminos, or low-sodium soy sauce can be used instead.
  • Sesame seeds – Use black sesame seeds, white sesame seeds, or a combination of both.
  • Ground black pepper
  • Ground ginger
  • Scallions

Can You Eat the Whole Shiitake Mushroom?

No, you can only eat the caps of the shiitake mushroom. Technically speaking, the stems are edible, but they’re too fibrous and tough to chew. They can be simmered in water to create mushroom stock, but otherwise they should be discarded. If your dried shiitakes still have stems on them, you’ll need to cut them off after you’ve reconstituted them.

Overhead view of shiitakes being reconstituted in water

How Do You Reconstitute Dried Mushrooms?

This recipe calls for dried shiitake mushrooms, so you’ll need to reconstitute them before starting the recipe. Here’s how to do it:

  • Place a cup of shiitakes in a bowl or jar and pour hot water over them so they’re completely submerged. If needed, you can place a smaller bowl on top to make sure the mushrooms stay submerged in the water.
  • Let the mushrooms soak until they’re plump. Depending on the age of your mushrooms, this can take anywhere between 5 to 20 minutes.
  • Use a slotted spoon to remove the mushrooms and dry them on paper towels. You can reserve the soaking liquid to make mushroom gravy, soups, or for simmering grains; it’ll keep in the fridge for a week, or you can freeze it for up to 6 months.

How to Make Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms

Once your mushrooms are ready, the rest of this dish takes minutes to make!

Prep the mushrooms. Cut the reconstituted shiitakes into thick slices and toss them in cornstarch.

Overhead view of mushrooms being cooked in enamel pan

Pan-fry the mushrooms. Set a skillet over medium-high heat and add the sesame oil. Once it’s warmed, add the mushrooms and fry until crisp on both sides, about 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl.

Make the sauce. Return the pan to the stovetop and reduce the heat to medium. Add the sauce ingredients and whisk; continue to whisk as the sauce cooks to prevent it from burning. Once thickened, taste and add additional maple syrup, if desired. 

Finish. Add the mushrooms back to the pan and toss to coat. Continue to cook until the sauce becomes thick and sticky, about 2 to 3 more minutes. Remove from heat and cool slightly before serving.

Sticky sesame shiitake mushrooms in enamel pan

Tips for Success

Here are some hints and tips to help you make perfect sticky shiitakes—and to make the recipe your own!

  • Dry the shiitakes well. If they’re water-logged when you place them in the frying pan, they’re likely to create oil spatters, and they also won’t cook up as crispy.
  • Make it spicy. Add sriracha or dried red pepper flakes if you want to add a kick to this recipe.
  • Meal prep ideas. These sticky shiitake mushrooms are ideal for meal prep lunches. Serve them with your favorite grain, steamed veggies, and Crispy Teriyaki Tofu.
Overhead view of stick sesame shiitakes in bowls with rice and veggies

How to Store and Reheat

You can store these mushrooms in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. They’re best reheated in the microwave until warmed through, although if you don’t have a microwave, you can heat them in a skillet set over medium-heat and add a splash of sesame oil to keep them from sticking.

Bowl of rice with sticky sesame shiitake mushrooms and steamed vegetables

Can This Recipe Be Frozen?

You can freeze Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms for up to 3 months. Place them in a small freezer bag or airtight container; you can microwave them from frozen or let them thaw in the refrigerator first.

Enjoy friends! If you make this Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushroom recipe, please snap a photo and tag #jessicainthekitchen on Instagram! We’d also love it if you would leave a comment below, and give the recipe a rating! Thanks so much!

Closeup of sticky sesame shiitake mushroom being picked up with chopstick
Bowl of rice with sticky sesame shiitake mushrooms, veggies, and chopsticks

Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms

These Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms are the perfect mix of sweet, salty and umami!
5 (from 10 ratings)

Ingredients

  • 1 cup dried shiitake mushrooms, 1 jar
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup*
  • 2 tablespoons liquid aminos
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger
  • chopped scallions & sesame seeds, for garnish
  • ½ teaspoon cornstarch + ½ teaspoon water

Instructions 

  • First things first, you’re going to want to reconstitute the dried mushrooms. Add 1 cup of mushrooms to a bowl or jar and pour hot water over them. Ensure the mushrooms are pushed down – maybe put something on top to ensure they are pushed into the water. Leave them to soak until plump, anywhere from 5 minutes to 20 minutes.
  • Dry the mushrooms as best as possible with some paper towels, then slice into thick slices. Coat them in the cornstarch until totally covered.
  • In a pan over medium high heat, heat the sesame oil. Add in mushrooms and fry up until completely crisp on both sides, about 3 to 5 minutes until the cornstarch is totally cooked out and the mushrooms are crisped up. Remove the mushrooms to a bowl (you can use the same bowl you tossed them into.
  • In the same, pan, add all the ingredients for the sauce over medium heat. You can either whisk them together in a small bowl before, or in the same pan, because dishes. Stir to prevent burning and let is thicken up, about 2 to 3 minutes. Taste the sauce and add the extra tablespoon maple syrup if you want it sweeter
  • Add back in the mushrooms, and toss to coat, until they become thick and sticky, about 2 to 3 more minutes. This may take a bit longer based on your mushrooms, so be sure to watch them.
  • Remove from heat, and allow to cool slightly. Serve with noodles, hot rice or anything else you want to serve them with. Enjoy!

Notes

To add heat, add some Sriracha to the sauce!
How to store: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. They’re best reheated in the microwave until warmed through, although if you don’t have a microwave, you can heat them in a skillet set over medium-heat and add a splash of sesame oil to keep them from sticking.
How to freeze: Freeze Sticky Sesame Shiitake Mushrooms for up to 3 months. Place them in a small freezer bag or airtight container; you can microwave them from frozen or let them thaw in the refrigerator first.
Calories: 359kcal, Carbohydrates: 53g, Protein: 7g, Fat: 15g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Sodium: 1929mg, Potassium: 475mg, Fiber: 4g, Sugar: 13g, Vitamin A: 120IU, Vitamin C: 3mg, Calcium: 22mg, Iron: 1mg

Disclaimer: Although jessicainthekitchen.com attempts to provide accurate nutritional information, kindly note that these are only estimates. Nutritional information may be affected based on the product type, the brand that was purchased, and in other unforeseeable ways. Jessicainthekitchen.com will not be held liable for any loss or damage resulting for your reliance on nutritional information. If you need to follow a specific caloric regimen, please consult your doctor first.